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Monday, 18 March 2019 00:00

Risk Factors for Athlete’s Foot

Contracting athlete’s foot can happen to anyone, but there are some risk factors that increase the chance of contracting this inconvenient condition. Public places like locker rooms, showers, and swimming pools are breeding grounds for bacteria, so exposing your bare feet to surfaces in these environments could easily lead to athlete’s foot. Sharing footwear or towels with someone who has been infected can spread the infection, so it’s best to avoid sharing these items. Wet or sweaty feet are also at a higher risk than feet that are kept dry and clean, because bacteria thrive in moist environments. Minor skin or nail injuries, especially in tight closed-toe shoes are also a risk factor. If you think you might have athlete’s foot or would like additional information on how to prevent it, then it is suggested you speak with a podiatrist.    

Athlete’s Foot

Athlete’s foot is often an uncomfortable condition to experience. Thankfully, podiatrists specialize in treating athlete’s foot and offer the best treatment options. If you have any questions about athlete’s foot, consult with one of our podiatrists from Sutera and Jones Surgical Podiatry. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality treatment.

What is Athlete’s Foot?

Tinea pedis, more commonly known as athlete’s foot, is a non-serious and common fungal infection of the foot. Athlete’s foot is contagious and can be contracted by touching someone who has it or infected surfaces. The most common places contaminated by it are public showers, locker rooms, and swimming pools. Once contracted, it grows on feet that are left inside moist, dark, and warm shoes and socks.

Prevention

The most effective ways to prevent athlete’s foot include:

  • Thoroughly washing and drying feet
  • Avoid going barefoot in locker rooms and public showers
  • Using shower shoes in public showers
  • Wearing socks that allow the feet to breathe
  • Changing socks and shoes frequently if you sweat a lot

Symptoms:

Athlete’s foot initially occurs as a rash between the toes. However, if left undiagnosed, it can spread to the sides and bottom of the feet, toenails, and if touched by hand, the hands themselves. Symptoms include:

  • Redness
  • Burning
  • Itching
  • Scaly and peeling skin

Diagnosis and Treatment

Diagnosis is quick and easy. Skin samples will be taken and either viewed under a microscope or sent to a lab for testing. Sometimes, a podiatrist can diagnose it based on simply looking at it. Once confirmed, treatment options include oral and topical antifungal medications.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Media and Glen Mills, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Warts are very common and come in many different forms. Plantar warts, also known as verrucae warts, differ from most other warts for various reasons. They only form on the sole of the foot and are a result of the human papillomavirus (HPV). They can easily be caught in places where there is moisture such as, locker rooms, pool areas, or saunas. Unlike most warts, plantar warts grow inward instead of outward. They plant themselves in the thick skin on the bottom of the foot, which can result in discomfort or pain. Discomfort and pain will increase when pressure is applied to the foot. Visually, they are flat, circular and have a small dent in the middle. Usually, they are dry with a black spot in the middle. If you think you might have plantar warts on the sole of your foot, then it is suggested you speak with a podiatrist in order to learn about treatment options.

Plantar warts can be very uncomfortable. If you need your feet checked, contact one of our podiatrists from Sutera and Jones Surgical Podiatry. Our doctors will assist you with all of your foot and ankle needs.

About Plantar Warts

Plantar warts are the result of HPV, or human papillomavirus, getting into open wounds on the feet. They are mostly found on the heels or balls of the feet.

While plantar warts are generally harmless, those experiencing excessive pain or those suffering from diabetes or a compromised immune system require immediate medical care. Plantar warts are easily diagnosed, usually through scraping off a bit of rough skin or by getting a biopsy.

Symptoms

  • Lesions on the bottom of your feet, usually rough and grainy
  • Hard or thick callused spots
  • Wart seeds, which are small clotted blood vessels that look like little black spots
  • Pain, discomfort, or tenderness of your feet when walking or standing

Treatment

  • Freezing
  • Electric tool removal
  • Laser Treatment
  • Topical Creams (prescription only)
  • Over-the-counter medications

To help prevent developing plantar warts, avoid walking barefoot over abrasive surfaces that can cause cuts or wounds for HPV to get into. Avoiding direct contact with other warts, as well as not picking or rubbing existing warts, can help prevent the further spread of plantar warts. However, if you think you have developed plantar warts, speak to your podiatrist. He or she can diagnose the warts on your feet and recommend the appropriate treatment options.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Media and Glen Mills, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 04 March 2019 00:00

How to Stretch the Feet

Research has shown the general health of the body may be improved when the feet are regularly stretched. Additionally, the risk of injury may be decreased, and circulation may improve. There are different types of exercises that can be implemented, and these may consist of resistance and flexibility stretches. The latter is designed to keep the feet limber, which may help to prevent injuries. Muscles can be strengthened by performing resistance exercises, and these may help to provide overall support to the foot. Many of these stretches can be performed during the work day while sitting in a chair. An effective foot stretch is practiced by lifting the foot off the floor while sitting down, followed by rotating the foot in a circle. After 15-20 rotations are completed, you can switch to the other foot. To strengthen your heel, it is recommended to sit down while placing your foot in a resistance band, which may be attached to a piece of furniture. The stretch can be felt while flexing the ankle. If you would like additional information about the benefits of stretching the feet, please consult with a podiatrist.

Stretching the feet is a great way to prevent injuries. If you have any concerns with your feet consult with one of our podiatrists from Sutera and Jones Surgical Podiatry. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Stretching the Feet

Stretching the muscles in the foot is an important part in any physical activity. Feet that are tight can lead to less flexibility and make you more prone to injury. One of the most common forms of foot pain, plantar fasciitis, can be stretched out to help ease the pain. Stretching can not only ease pain from plantar fasciitis but also prevent it as well. However, it is important to see a podiatrist first if stretching is right for you. Podiatrists can also recommend other ways to stretch your feet. Once you know whether stretching is right for you, here are some excellent stretches you can do.

  • Using a foam roller or any cylindrical object (a water bottle or soda can will do), roll the object under your foot back and forth. You should also exert pressure on the object. Be sure to do this to both feet for a minute. Do this exercise three times each.
  • Similar to the previous one, take a ball, such as a tennis ball, and roll it under your foot while seated and exert pressure on it.
  • Grab a resistance band or towel and take a seat. If you are using a towel, fold it length wise. Next put either one between the ball of your foot and heel and pull with both hands on each side towards you. Hold this for 15 seconds and then switch feet. Do this three times for each foot.
  • Finally hold your big toe while crossing one leg over the other. Pull the toe towards you and hold for 15 seconds. Once again do this three times per foot.

It is best to go easy when first stretching your foot and work your way up. If your foot starts hurting, stop exercising and ice and rest the foot. It is advised to then see a podiatrist for help.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Media and Glen Mills, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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